John C. Chao, D.D.S.

Research Associate Professor, University at Buffalo, SUNY
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Ostrow School of Dentistry, USC

(626) 308-9104

News & Press



Wine Tasting Can Dissolve Your Enamel

A new study suggests that wine tasting can be bad for your teeth. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (3/25, Nancarrow) reports that a study from the University of Adelaide in Australia has shown that “just 10 one-minute wine tastings can bring a softening of the tooth enamel.” Researchers said that the “acidic levels found in wine were similar to those in orange juice,” and that people who taste wine, as opposed to simply drinking it, have an increased risk for tooth break-down because of the additional swirling of wine in the mouth associated with tasting wine, increasing exposure of wine to the tooth. The researchers advise frequent wine tasters use fluoride treatments to help protect their tooth structure.

This does not mean that you can’t ever occasionally go wine tasting. You obviously have to do a lot of wine-tasting to get a detrimental after-effect. For the same reason that has to do with acidity, it is not advisable to frequently suck on lemons, oranges or anything else that’s acidic.

If you suspect there has already been chemical erosion of your front teeth, check with your dentist about what you should do to address the erosion and how to prevent future damage.

Citric fruits taken in moderation are beneficial to your health in many ways, among which is that it is good source of vitamin C.

Another way you can lose enamel is over-brushing your front teeth. The back and forth motion with the hand brush can cause not only enamel erosion but also shrinkage of the gums. Receding gums is associated with the “long tooth syndrome.” This exposure of the roots of the teeth can give you can undesirable smile also.

Check with your dentist as to how you should brush your teeth correctly, without leaving plaque or over-brushing your teeth.


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